en pl
en pl

Central European Management Journal

Zobacz wydanie
Rok 2019 
Tom 27 
Numer 4

Interdependence Among Creativity, Education,and Job Experience: A Municipal Company in Poland

Marek Jabłoński
Cracow University of Economics

2019 27 (4) Central European Management Journal

DOI 10.7206/cemj.2658-0845.9

Abstrakt

Purpose: The technological progress of production processes causes changes in the social structure
of work, i.e. modifies the content of most, if not all, workplaces. In that respect, the identification
of changes in the intensity of creativeness, the level of education, and the experience of employees
in production processes and occupational tasks is a particularly important issue. The article investigates
the interdependence among work creativity, education, and job experience of employees of
one of the municipal companies operating in Poland.

Methodology: The study employs firm-level data covering over 2,200 observations. The study gathered
data from three major internal sources of information: the scopes of responsibilities of organizational
positions, personnel documentation regarding the individual level of education and
professional experience, and the results of interviews with executive staff and employees on particular
posts. The research proceedings base on document analysis, structured interviews, teamwork
methods, and a classification technique.

Results: Research revealed that the complexity of work increased in the company. Jobs requiring
higher levels of creativity are occupied by employees with relatively higher education. However,
their average level of education in the analyzed period decreased as opposed to jobs that require
relatively lower levels of creativity. The analysis of interdependence between creativity and job
experience identified that there emerged a relatively shorter average job experience for employees
who perform cognitive work. Moreover, the average job experience increased in the group of employees
who perform routine manual and non-routine cognitive work.

Implications: The study refers to the job polarization issue by confirming the tendencies of labor
markets. It also addresses issues concerned with technological progress, although they are not
confirmed by research in this paper.

Originality/Value: The main contribution of the paper is the interesting dataset gathered. Furthermore,
the paper addresses an interesting question where empirical research at the firm level is
lacking, particularly municipal company.

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Cytowanie zasobu

APA style

Jabłoński, M. . (2019). Interdependence Among Creativity, Education,and Job Experience: A Municipal Company in Poland. Central European Management Journal, 27(4), 48-70. https://doi.org/10.7206/cemj.2658-0845.9 (Original work published 2019)

MLA style

Jabłoński, M. . „Interdependence Among Creativity, Education,and Job Experience: A Municipal Company In Poland”. 2019. Central European Management Journal, t. 27, nr 4, 2019, ss. 48-70.

Chicago style

Jabłoński, Marek . „Interdependence Among Creativity, Education,and Job Experience: A Municipal Company In Poland”. Central European Management Journal, Central European Management Journal, 27, nr 4 (2019): 48-70. doi:10.7206/cemj.2658-0845.9.