en pl
en pl

Central European Management Journal

Zobacz wydanie
Rok 2018 
Tom 26 
Numer 1

Snobbish Bandwagoners: Ambiguity of Luxury Goods’ Perception

Beata Stępień
Poznań University of Economics and Business

2018 26 (1) Central European Management Journal

DOI 10.7206/jmba.ce.2450-7814.220

Abstrakt

Purpose: The article explores the grounds of possible interrelations of snob and bandwagon consumers’ inclinations in the luxury fashion sector. The reason to investigate this comes from the growth of inconsistent evidence among analyses of this subject. Consumers’ perception of luxury goods seems not only compound but also quite ambiguous at the same time. One of its reasons may be the wrong assumption that snob and bandwagon inclinations are opposite trends that cannot co-exist among individual motives of luxury purchases.

Methodology and fndings: The mixed method research – in the form of international consumers’ e-survey and semi-structured interviews with affluent consumers – reveals that mutual relations of these two trends are clearly visible and can both motivate purchase at the same time.

Powiązania

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  76. Dubois, B. and Paternault, C. (1997). Does luxury have a home country? An investigation of country images in Europe. Marketing & Research Today, 25: 79–85. [Google Scholar]
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  83. Kapferer, J.N. (2008). The New Strategic Brand Management: Creating and Sustaining Brand Equity Long Term, 4th ed. London: Kogan Page. [Google Scholar]
  84. Kapferer, J.-N. (1997). Managing luxury brands. Journal of Brand Management, 4: 251–260, https://doi.org/10.1057/bm.1997.4 [Google Scholar]
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  87. Kapferer, J.-N. and Valette-Florence, P. (2018). The impact of brand penetration and awareness on luxury brand desirability: A cross country analysis of the relevance of the rarity principle. Journal of Business Research, 83: 38–50, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2017.09.025 [Google Scholar]
  88. Kastanakis, M.N. and Balabanis, G. (2012). Between the mass and the class: antecedents of the “bandwagon” luxury consumption behavior. Journal of Business Research, 65(10): 1399–1407, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2011.10.005 [Google Scholar]
  89. Kastanakis, M.N. and Balabanis, G. (2014). Explaining variation in conspicuous luxury consumption: An individual differences’ perspective. Journal of Business Research, 67(10): 2147–2154, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2014.04.024 [Google Scholar]
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  94. O’ Cass, A. and Frost, H. (2002). Status brands: Examining the effects of non-product brand associations on status and conspicuous consumption. Journal of Product & Brand Management, 11(2): 67–88. [Google Scholar]
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  96. Otnes, C., Lowrey, T. and Shrum, L. (1997). Toward an Understanding of Consumer Ambivalence. Journal of Consumer Research, 24: 80–94, https://doi.org/10.1086/209495 [Google Scholar]
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  98. Shukla, P. (2010). Status consumption in cross-national context. Socio-psychological, brand and situational antecedents. International Marketing Review, 27: 108–129, https://doi.org/10.1108/02651331011020429 [Google Scholar]
  99. Simon, H. (1954). Bandwagon and underdog effects and the possibility of election predictions. Public Opinion Quarterly, 18(3): 245–253, https://doi.org/10.1086/266513 [Google Scholar]
  100. Sirgy, M.J. (1985). Using self-congruity and ideal congruity to predict purchase motivation. Journal of Business Research, 13(3): 195–206, https://doi.org/10.1016/0148-2963(85)90026-8 [Google Scholar]
  101. Tian, KT, Bearden, W.O. and Hunter, G.L. (2001). Consumers’ need for uniqueness: scale development and validation. Journal of Consumer Research, 28: 50–66, https://doi.org/10.1086/321947 [Google Scholar]
  102. Tsai, S.P. (2005). Impact of personal orientation on luxury-brand purchase value: An international investigation. International Journal of Market Research, 47: 429–454, https://doi.org/10.1177/147078530504700403 [Google Scholar]
  103. Veblen, T. (1899). The Theory of the Leisure Class. [Google Scholar]
  104. Vigneron, F. and Johnson, L.W. (1999). A review and a conceptual framework of prestige-seeking consumer behaviour. Academy of Marketing Science Review, 1: 1–15. [Google Scholar]
  105. Vigneron, F. and Johnson, L.W. (2004). Measuring perceptions of brand luxury. Journal of Brand Management, 11(6): 484–506, https://doi.org/10.1057/palgrave.bm.2540194 [Google Scholar]
  106. Wheeler, L.(1966). Motivation as a determinant of upward comparison. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Supplement, 1: 27–31, https://doi.org/10.1016/0022-1031(66)90062-X [Google Scholar]
  107. Wiedmann, K.P., Hennigs, N. and Siebels, A. (2009). Value-based segmentation of luxury consumption behaviour. Psychology & Marketing, 26(7): 625–651, https://doi.org/10.1002/mar.20292 [Google Scholar]
  108. Wills, T.A. (1981). Downward comparison principles in social psychology. Psychological Bulletin, 90: 245–271,https://doi.org/10.1037/0033-2909.90.2.245 [Google Scholar]
  109. Wong, A., Chung,Y. and Zaichkowsky, J.L. (1999). Understanding luxury brands in Hong Kong. European Advances in Consumer Research, 4: 310–316. [Google Scholar]
  110. Wood, J.V. (1989). Theory and research concerning social comparisons of personal attributes. Psychological Bulletin, 106(2): 231–248, https://doi.org/10.1037/0033-2909.106.2.231 [Google Scholar]

Kompletne metadane

Cytowanie zasobu

APA style

Stępień, B. . (2018). Snobbish Bandwagoners: Ambiguity of Luxury Goods’ Perception. Central European Management Journal, 26(1), 79-99. https://doi.org/10.7206/jmba.ce.2450-7814.220 (Original work published 2018)

MLA style

Stępień, B. . „Snobbish Bandwagoners: Ambiguity Of Luxury Goods’ Perception”. 2018. Central European Management Journal, t. 26, nr 1, 2018, ss. 79-99.

Chicago style

Stępień, Beata . „Snobbish Bandwagoners: Ambiguity Of Luxury Goods’ Perception”. Central European Management Journal, Central European Management Journal, 26, nr 1 (2018): 79-99. doi:10.7206/jmba.ce.2450-7814.220.